after-birth

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  i-am-pregnant 1 year, 10 months ago.

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  • #10680616

    i-am-pregnant
    Keymaster

    Child spacing

    Doctors recommend to wait 18-24 months before getting pregnant again. Pregnancies spaced 18-23 months result in a lower risk of low birth weight and premature delivery. .

    Other advantages may be that this time allows:
    • each child to spend time with her/his mother,
    • the family to save some money (since diapers and clothes are costly),
    • the mother to replace the nutrients her body used during pregnancy (especially nutrients such as iron, folate, Vitamins B6 and B12, and calcium), and
    • the family to adjust to the new family member.

    Oral Contraceptives and Other Hormonal Contraceptives

    Barrier methods of contraception (condoms, diaphragm) have no effect on milk supply and are preferred. However, most women can also use progestin-only methods of hormonal contraception with little effect on the breastmilk and milk supply.

    Progestin-only methods include:

    • The `mini-pill` (oral contraceptive).
    • Depo-Provera (injected contraceptive).
    • Progestin-IUDs (inserted into the uterus).

    Wait until lactation is established (at least six weeks) before starting progestin- only contraceptives. It is also recommended that the mother uses the `mini-pill` before trying the other methods, as the pill can be stopped immediately if there is a problem with milk supply. The mini-pill must be taken at the same time each day to be effective.

    Nursing mothers can also use combined oral contraceptives pills containing both estrogen and progestin and a combined injection. Estrogen can decrease the milk supply, so it is recommended that mothers wait to start an estrogen containing contraception until after their babies are six months old. The baby should be monitored for appropriate weight gain.

    Mini Pill

    low-dose contraceptive pill containing progestin, taken daily, that prevents egg release and causes uterus opening to thicken, which stops sperm from reaching the egg.

    Advantages:

    • Less risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and uterine cancer
    • Safe for breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding mothers
    • Safe for women who cannot take estrogen
    • Low failure rate (3%)
    • Fewer side effects and health risks when compared to combination birth control pills
    • Light or no periods
    • Less menstrual cramping

    Disadvantages:

    • Does not protect from HIV infection or other STDs
    • Can cause irregular menstrual periods
    • Less effective than combination birth control pills

    Depo-Provera

    A synthetic hormone, usually injected into the upper arm or buttocks, that prevents ovulation

    Advantages:

    • Effective within 24 hours of injection
    • Shot lasts for about 12 weeks
    • Low failure rate (less than 1%)
    • May protect against endometrial (uterine) cancer and ovarian cancer
    • Convenient
    • Useful for women who cannot take estrogen
    • May reduce menstrual cramps

    Disadvantages:

    • Does not protect from HIV infection or other STDs
    • May delay conception as long as 18 months after ending use
    • May cause changes in menstrual blood flow (often fewer and lighter periods, sometimes longer and heavier periods, sometimes light spotting and breakthrough bleeding)

    Intrauterine Device (IUD)

    A small plastic device that contains copper or uses a natural hormone, inserted into the uterus to prevent conception.

    Advantages:

    • Can last from 1-10 years
    • Low failure rate (2%)
    • Does not affect a woman`s hormones
    • Convenient

    Disadvantages:

    • Increased risk of infection for women who have more than one sex partner or whose partner has other partners
    • Does not protect from HIV infection or other STDs
    • Can perforate uterus (rare occurrence)
    • Can lead to iron deficiency
    • May cause changes in menstrual blood flow
    • May cause cramping after insertion
    • Initial cost is high

    Glossary:

    mini pill– The mini pill, taken daily, is a low-dose contraceptive pill containing progestin that prevents egg release and causes the uterus opening to thicken, stopping sperm from reaching the egg.

    Depo-Povera– Depo-Povera is a synthetic hormone, usually injected into the upper arm or buttocks, that prevents ovulation.

    intrauterine device (IUD)– An intrauterine device is a small plastic device, that contains copper or a natural hormone, that is inserted into the uterus to prevent conception.

    #10680818

    ive just added a blog about the IUS (mirena coil) if anyones intrested in my experience. thank x

    #10680819

    i am 7 weeks postpartum. i had pp bleeding for 5 weeks then i stopped for 2 days then i got my Mirena iud put in and have been bleeding for about a week and a half now. i think its just my first AF. not sure though. i am still BF. so far i like the IUD. havent had any problems with it yet.

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